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Posts Tagged ‘May Lin Le Goff’

No more Miss Nice…

September 22nd, 2010 Comments off

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I am tired of saving the day.
This earth worth fixing for?
More expectations comes with his honour,
How much more do I carry with humanity’s self centredness?
No more cheers, no more loving,
As I allow myself to crash and burn.
Shaking with excitement,
numbed and speechless.
I let myself go,
no more control, no more help.
I am done saving the day,
I am done being your super hero.

The Team

Photography / May Lin Le Goff
Fashion Direction / Ashburn Eng
Hair & Make-up / Mav Chang
Model / Egzona Lulaj and  Maria Z (Upfront Models
Text / Luth Seah Zhiqiang
Styling Assistance / Shanna Matthew
Designers / Angelyn Yii, Benjamin Tsu Zhong Hong, Li Sang, Lucia Jacky, Nelly Liu, Stephanie Ng Yue Fen, Vicole Lang.

young&restless “RITUAL” Autumn Winter 2010 Campaign by Test Shoot Gallery

August 26th, 2010 Comments off

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The Team
Photography / May Lin Le Goff
Designer & Creative Direction / Ashburn Eng
Graphic Artist / Yong Yi ( www.yongyidesign.com )
Make-up and Hair / Larry Yeo using Cle De Peau Beaute and Redken
Model  / Egzona Lulaj ( Upfront Models )
Styling Assistance / Shanna Matthew  

 
 
 
 
 
 
The Interview 

TSG is excited and very proud to announce the launch of the new label young&restless, a line designed by our TSG founder, Ashburn Eng, in collaboration with Singaporean label max.tan. Hear it from the man himself about the setting up of the label, crossing over to design and the inspiration behind the first collection titled “Ritual” in our exclusive TSG interview. By Luth Seah Zhiqiang

 

 

 
TSG: Can you tell us how you created your Young&Restless label?  

After a successful ad campaign collaboration, Ashburn Eng and Max Tan formed a friendship that lead both the fashion stylist and fashion designer respectively to more creative partnerships. Often, the pair would find themselves nodding their heads in agreement with each other’s opinions and comments on most topics; fashion related or not. Hence, with no surprises, aesthetically, the pair are very much in-sync. Therefore, “Young&Restless” is launched.

 

 

TSG: Where does the label’s name originate from? 

Not to be taken literally to refer to hyperactive youth, “Young&Restless” simply caters to women who view themselves as carefree, and not bounded by the “reservations” that comes with age. It is for the free-spirited, for the confident, and for the unpretentious. They are not bothered about the numbers of age, they are forever young. They will not be tied down; they are always on the move.

 

 

TSG: How would you describe your design aesthetic?

I like things to be instinctive, random and pure. I like the idea of  juxtaposing masculine tailoring with the softness that I put in the fabric so there is a duality between sensuality and strength. I am not particularly frilly and I like to avoid things that are too embellished. Definitely appreciate a certain hardness and drama.  A firm believer in non-traditional pattern-making and I avoid superfluous seaming and construction in my apparels; seams should follow a woman’s body and thereby accentuate it. Not merely using the amount of fabric and cut it the easiest and most cost effective way like in a mass market factory.

 

 

TSG: What kind of person wears your designs?

A modern woman who is sophisticated yet bold enough to be day tripper and desires to be different.

 

 

TSG: What made you decide to get into fashion design? Have you always been interested in it?

I always have great interest in design, photography and fashion. The accumulative years of styling and consultation experiences working with magazine, commercial clients, design graduates and fashion designers have shaped the way I understand how publications, fashion and retail businesses work. Therefore I feel it is a natural progression for me to craft something on my own.

 

 

TSG: Your debut collection has a somewhat occult theme behind it. What’s the inspiration?

I wanted to work with the popular subject of the occult. A past exhibition that I came across entitled “Worship the light, Worship the dark”, instigate an explicit relationship between spiritual forces and something potentially sinister. The idea of worshipping the light has been perverted into something more evil. Certain more hedonistic experiences occur in the dark as well. It is a free space to experiment with little conscious morale restraint. For me, it is not the gothic that intrigues but the darker side of imagination, rather the culture of fear and self limitation that exists in some urban contexts today.

 

 

TSG: Have you ever experienced the supernatural?

I had a very scary experience once, that even till today I am still confused about what actually happened. My friend and I were walking in around in Chinatown early one morning after a late supper. In the corner of my eye, I saw this old man with slivery hair and shabby torned clothes. I first thought he was a hobo, but then I realised that his eyes were hollowed out.

I did not feel that something was amiss as I presumed the dim lighting was playing tricks on my eyes. But I turned to my friend and asked if he saw the same thing. He nodded in agreement. We both turn back for a second look of the old man but he had disappeared. At that point, we walked as fast as our legs could carry us.

 

 

TSG: What is the quality that brings your clothing line to life?

I create my clothes as an expression of my daydreams and use the clothes to evoke emotions from my clients. Sometimes, I would describe my job as selling a dream to my clients. I also enjoy bringing in the influence of the occult, fetishes and fantasies into my clothes, to deliver a different state of mind. I hope to impart this to the young&restless’s wearer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockist

MAX.TAN at Parco Marina Bay - 9 Raffles Boulevard, Millenia Walk, Parco next NEXT section, Level 2

Links

www.young-and-restless.com (coming your way) 

 

young&restless “RITUAL” Autumn/Winter 2010 campaign & interview by TSG coming your way..

August 23rd, 2010 Comments off

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The Team

Photography / May Lin Le Goff
Designer & Creative Direction / Ashburn Eng
Graphic Artist / Yong Yi ( www.yongyidesign.com )
Make-up and Hair / Larry Yeo
Model  / Egzona Lulaj ( Upfront Models )
Styling Assistance / Shanna Matthew

Max.Tan “AGAINST” Autumn Winter 2010 Campaign by Test Shoot Gallery

July 19th, 2010 Comments off








 
 
 
The Team
Photography / May Lin Le Goff
Creative & Fashion Direction / Ashburn Eng
Fashion Designer / Max.Tan by Max Tan
Make-up / Mav Chang
Hair / Annie Tay
Model & Text / Luth Seah Zhiqiang
Styling Assistance / Shanna Matthew

 

 

The Interview

Max Tan has returned in new collaboration with Test Shoot Gallery for his Autumn/Winter 2010 collection titled “Against”. This collection follows the success of the first ad campaign for his Spring/Summer S2010 “Pressed” collection, also with Test Shoot Gallery.  Featuring a darker colour palette and a looser draping silhouette, the emerging designer challenges us with the question of what’s right (or wrong) in fashion. Hear about the designer’s opinion on conventional society, the “austere” emotion in his pieces, as well as all the must-knows about the designer behind this ever-growing eponymous label in our second exclusive Test Shoot Gallery interview. By Luth Seah Zhiqiang

 

 

 

 

 

TSG: The most of the world we live in has nothing to do with fashion nor finds interest in it. Whom do you work for and target? What does your work reflect?

I work purely for my own vision and by asking rhetorical questions. Through this rhetoric, I challenge how I can answer with my collection in a different manner. In that way, I hope to change the stereotypical image that the mainstream relates to the fashion industry, and I hope through that, it engages people to relate more to fashion, that there is more than what is presented to them on a commercial platform.

 

 

TSG: Can you tell us a bit about the starting point of the A/W collection? Technically, what are the differences between this season compared to your past collection?

The starting point of each max.tan collection is always either a question, or a challenge. It challenges the way we perceive objects, subjects or sometimes just purely a notion. S/S 2010 Pressed challenged the different ways I could re-imagine a white shirt. A/W 2010-11 challenges the right and wrong ways of traditional drafting. What is deemed right or wrong? Can the wrong be made to look right? If so, is the end result still regarded as a mistake?

 

 

TSG: In provoking the notion of “traditional methods of pattern making”, did you come across any interesting or unexpected interpretations of your collection by different people?

It is definitely an interesting collection to work on. Some have looked at my garments and have had difficulties in identifying the conflicting  elements used. For instance a particular piece from the collection is a jumpsuit which can be worn as a dress- it seems right when worn as a jumpsuit, what they do not realise is that the dress can be created off the jumpsuit from a different perspective. Worn as a dress, the jumpsuit hangs off it when looked at straight on.  Which is right then? Ultimately, this collection serves to send a message that we no longer have to care about what is right or wrong. Would you rather be right, or free?
 

 

TSG: Your collection seems to lean strongly towards the austere? Why do you think austerity is often dark and surreal with the suggestion of tragedy and death?

In death, everything that one acquires during his lifetime is proven to be transient. Everything is once again, blank. Austerity is simple, blank and stripped of details. That is also the reason why the collection vaguely alludes to funeral clothing.
 

 

TSG: What materials have you worked with in this collection to create such textural and protective shapes?

I worked with a crepe for this particular collection. It was a popular fabric for power suits during the ’80s. Camouflaged by the sharp lines of the suits, we have truly neglected how beautiful it is when the fabric is allowed to fall freely.

 

 

TSG: You mostly use dark and monochrome colours – is that why you don’t believe in seasons? What was the inspiration behind the colours?

A main area of interest in my creations are silhouettes. I believe monochromatic colours do not distract one’s eye from how differently or interesting my silhouettes are.

 

 

TSG: What are your opinions about life in conventional society?

At times, I do feel quite alone. It is hard to find someone whom I can relate to, even harder to have someone give constructive comments because there is hardly anyone I know that can understand what I am doing.  Then again, I am thankful for the few who understand and constantly critique my works so that I can improve.

 

 

TSG: Can you tell us a bit about your environment while growing up?

I grew up in a typically Singaporean environment. As a boy, I was not expected to do fashion despite the influence of my seamstress mother. Everyone seemed too caught up in the pursuit of the correct path that I was to
take on. It came to a point that I realised I needed to start living my own life and make my own choices. My teenage years were confusing with regards to my sexual orientation and career. I was considered unorthodox in the grownups’ eyes. It wasn’t a particularly enjoyable growing up experience, but it has contributed to who I have become.

 

 

TSG: If not for fashion, what would you be doing now and why?

I would have been a musician. Like fashion, it provides an escape from this endless pursuit of normality.

 

 

TSG: What is the worst question you have ever been asked?

Why I make clothes that do not fit. I see my creations as a cocoon, a safe armor that shields one from the stereotypical world. I disagree that my clothes are oversized, but in certain areas, it is made to fit and sit well on the wearer. I think creating this space between the wearer’s body and the garment is far more challenging than making clothes that just pieces together like a flat jigsaw puzzle. I prefer it to look at clothes in a 3D way, like a sculpture, rather than a painting.

 

 

TSG: How do you pick your materials, and what goes into your decisions when putting them together?

With an idea of the silhouette that I have in mind for the collection, I proceed to choosing the right fabrics which will in turn give me the desired results. It does take some experimentation with sample yardages for certain complex designs. I have do have a preference towards either fabrics in which are easy to sculpt, or fabrics with enough weight to fall nicely. The wearer’s comfort is also another important deciding factor. Although I
like the relation between fashion and art, fashion is however not entirely art.

 

 

TSG: How did fashion appeal to you to become a designer?

Garments allow one to take on an identity; changing our identities when we put on a different outfit. I think I am particularly drawn to fashion because, to a certain extent, I am an escapist. Clothes serve as an escape from who I need to become or who I am.

 

 

TSG: What does the term ‘beauty’ mean to you?

Beauty to me is fragile and transient but a non-stop chase to the end of the rainbow.

 

 

TSG: Can you tell us about your design process?

I start each collection with a challenge. I start draping and sketching at the same time. As I work with readily available monochromatic colours, I source only when I have finalised my designs. However during the design process, the properties of the ideal fabric are taken into consideration when developing the collection.

 

 

TSG: Best compliment ever?

It would have to be ranked together with the big players (Prada, Alexander Mcqueen, Valentino etc) in the summary of Spring/Summer 2010 women’s wear campaigns on the trend forecasting and reporting website, Stylesight.com. It was an extremely captivating campaign envisioned by Test Shoot Gallery and it proved so successful that it caught the eyes of the analysts behind a trend forecasting service.

Link

 

We’re mentioned in The Straits Times, Urban!

July 2nd, 2010 Comments off

 

The Team

Photography / May Lin Le Goff
Creative Director / Ashburn Eng
Hair & Make-up / Larry Yeo using Beyu & Redken
Model / Taisya P (Upfront Models)
Styling Assistant / Shanna Matthew
Outfit / Bottega Venetta 

 

 

IAN LEE speaks to three emerging local fashion photographers who finished top in the Canon Fashion Season@Orchard Fashion Photography Challenge and gets them to each shoot a picture to showcase their style. The Fashion Season@Orchard(FSO), organised by the Orchard Road Business Association (Orba) and held in April, helped to give the fashion photography scene here a boost with the Canon FSO Fashion Photography Challenge. Between March 25 and April 20, budding photographers were invited to submit up to five photos. A total of 210 photographers from 11 countries, including Australia, Vietnam, Indonesia and Ireland sent in entries for the contest, which offered more than $7,000 worth of Canon cameras as prizes.

A panel of judges from Canon Singapore, Singapore Tourism Board, Orba and Singapore Press Holdings shortlisted 20 photographs, which were exhibited in front of Ion Orchard and The Heeren from May 1 to 9. Public votes made up 25 per cent of each participating photographer’s score, while votes from the panel of judges made up the remaining 75 per cent. Urban speaks to the top three winners of the Canon FSO Fashion Photography Challenge to find out more about their shooting style. We also got them to showcase their personal aesthetic by shooting the same model in a dress from Bottega Veneta’s pre-fall collection. They were allowed to pick their own styling team and additional accessories for the shoot. 

 

 

MAY LIN LE GOFF, 21
First place in Canon FSO Fashion Photography Challenge 2010

Background: 
She has three years of experience, starting with an internship as a photo-journalist at The Straits Times in 2007. Subsequently, she joined commercial photography studio Calibre as an intern before being hired as an
assistant photographer for a year. Currently a freelance photographer, she will be leaving for New York next month to study fine arts at the School Of Visual Arts.

Style:
Alternative and moody, she prefers to veer away from standard notions of beauty. “I like to explore different angles and my pictures capture emotional qualities ranging from strength to vulnerability,” says Le Goff.

Favourite photographers:
British photographer Nick Knight and Chinese photographer Chen Man Er, whose works do not conform to conventional notions of beauty. Also inspired by the strong, feminine and architectural qualities of Swedish fashion photographer Camilla Akrans’ work.

Recent projects:
A set of campaign pictures for local label Max.Tan’s spring/summer 2010 collection, shot at the Marina Barrage last year, was selected as one of the top 10 advertising campaigns for spring/summer 2010 womenswear by American online trend website Stylesight.com. It was listed alongside international advertising campaigns from Prada, Alexander McQueen, Chanel, Tommy Hilfiger and Valentino. The budding photographer has just finished shooting Max.Tan’s fall/winter campaign.

Shoot concept:
“I wanted to bring out a sexy physicality from the model and dress, so I focused on her curves and the silhouette of the dress. We did not want to over-dress the outfit because the pre-fall season is associated with wearable clothes,” says Le Goff.

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